Don Levin knows what he wants from next Chicago Wolves

Chicago Wolves (AHL) - Hockey

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[DeCock] Hurricanes likely to cut ties with Checkers next week, but leave door open for return

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[Strickland] Some talk of the Florida Panthers moving their AHL team to Chicago next season. Would create an AHL opening in Springfield.

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Vegas Golden Knights Purchase AHL Franchise Membership

Vegas Golden Knights Purchase AHL Franchise Membership submitted by Bigedmond to goldenknights [link] [comments]

Has there ever been a player involved in as many big trades for one team as Tobias Lindberg, while not being the centerpiece in any?

Lindberg was drafted in the fourth round, 102nd overall by the Ottawa Senators in the 2013 NHL Entry Draft. He signed an ELC with Ottawa in 2015, and put up 22 points in 34 AHL games, before being involved in his first trade, on February 9, 2016.
Ottawa Acquires Toronto Acquires
Dion Phaneuf Jared Cowen
Matt Frattin Colin Greening
Casey Bailey Milan Michalek
Ryan Rupert 2017 2nd Round Pick (Eemeli Rasanen)
Cody Donaghey Tobias Lindberg
This trade's centerpiece was obviously Phaneuf heading to Ottawa, and it wouldn't be the last trade of Lindberg's career. Lindberg actually made his NHL debut in the final part of the 2015-16 season, on a Leafs team that went 29–42–11. At the start of the 2017-18 season, on October 6, 2017, Lindberg was involved in another trade, this time to Vegas.
Toronto Acquires Vegas Acquires
Calvin Pickard Tobias Lindberg
2018 6th Round Pick (Peter Diliberatore)
Pickard immediately cleared waivers, whereas Lindberg spent 5 months with Vegas' AHL team, the Chicago Wolves, before being involved in yet another big trade involving the team that drafted him, the Ottawa Senators on February 23, 2018.
Vegas Acquires Ottawa Acquires Pittsburgh Acquires
Ryan Reaves Ian Cole Derick Brassard
2018 4th Round Pick (Slava Demin) Filip Gustavsson 2018 3rd Round Pick (Dealt to COL for the pick used to get Filip Hallander)
2018 1st Round Pick (Dealt to NYR for picks that chose Jacob Bernard-Docker, Jonathan Tychonick) Vincent Dunn
2019 3rd Round Pick (Dealt to CAR for the pick used to get Mads Sogaard) Tobias Lindberg
Now three trades in a career are usually enough for most players, but Lindberg wasn't done yet, and he especially wasn't done with the Senators. On December 5, 2018, Lindberg was involved in another AHL trade.
Pittsburgh Acquires Ottawa Acquires
Macoy Erkamps Stefan Elliot
Ben Sexton Tobias Lindberg
Both Elliot and Lindberg reported to Ottawa's AHL affiliate, the Belleville Senators. I know what you're thinking. "Four trades? I mean that's unusual, but not out of the realm of possibility." I still remember where i was when the next trade happened. On February 25, 2019, I was sitting in the student's lounge of my university with some of my friends, and my phone was dead. My friend, who was a Leafs fan, looked at her phone, and then turned it over to me.
Ottawa Acquires Vegas Acquires
Erik Brannstrom Mark Stone
Oscar Lindberg Tobias Lindberg
2020 2nd Round Pick
On June 25, 2019, Lindberg was not tendered a qualifying offer by the Golden Knights, allowing him to become a free agent. Of the five trades Lindberg was a part of, four involved the Ottawa Senators. All said and done, Lindberg put up two assists, four PIM in six career NHL games. My question to you is this:
Has there ever been a player involved in as many big trades for one team as Tobias Lindberg, while not being the centerpiece in any?
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NHL teams that own AHL teams

After the Vegas purchase of the Rampage, I was curious how many other NHL teams owned their affiliated AHL team. I couldn't find a list anywhere online (probably just didn't search well enough), so decided to try and make my own list. Anyways I was surprised how many NHL teams now own their affiliates. After today's purchase by Vegas 20/32 NHL teams (including Seattle) now own an AHL team.
Anyways here's the list, I think it's mostly accurate, but research in bed after midnight isn't the most reliable, so I apologize if there's any mistakes
Same owners (20):
Anahiem Ducks / San Diego Gulls
Arizona Coyotes / Tuscon Roadrunners
Buffalo Sabres / Rochester Americans
Calgary Flames / Stockton Heat
Dallas Stars / Texas Stars
Edmonton Oilers / Bakersfield Condors
Los Angeles Kings / Ontario Reign
Minnesota Wild / Iowa Wild
Montreal Canadiens / Laval Rockets
New Jersey Devils/ Binghamton Devils
New York Islanders / Bridgeport Sound Tigers
New York Rangers / Hartford Wolf Pack
Ottawa Senators / Belleville Senators
Pittsburgh Penguins / WBS Penguins
San Jose Sharks / San Jose Barracuda
Seattle / Palm Springs
Toronto Maple Leafs / Toronto Marlies
Vancouver Canucks / Utica Comets
Vegas Golden Knights / Henderson
Winnipeg Jets / Manitoba Moose
Different owners (11):
Boston Bruins / Providence Bruins
Carolina Hurricanes / Charlotte Checkers
Colarado Avalanche / Colarado Eagles
Columbus Blue Jackets / Cleveland Monsters
Chicago Blackhawks / Rockford Icehogs
Detroit Red Wings / Grand Rapids Griffins
Florida Panthers / Springfield Thunderbirds
Nashville Predators / Milwaukee Admirals
Philadelphia Flyers / Leigh Valley Phantoms
Tampa Bay Lightning / Syracuse Crunch
Washington Capitals / Hershey Bears
Unaffiliated(1 NHL / 1 AHL):
St. Louis Blues
Chicago Wolves
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AHL teams are made up of their NHL affiliates prospects... right?....

I’m confused here.
Just read that the Chicago Wolves are the AHL affiliate of Vegas. But before Vegas they were the Blues AHL team, and before that Vancouver, and before that the Atlanta Tharshers.
How can this be if the rights to the players on the roster of the affiliated team are owned by the NHL team?
submitted by Vercingetrix to hockey [link] [comments]

[COMETS HARVEST] Utica Comets Dominate the Charlotte Checkers 8-2, for their fourth straight win

THE COMETS HARVEST

 
Welcome, all to the 4th edition of the Comets Harvest! The Comets are in unprecedented territory, having won three games to start their season for the first time since, well, ever! Matter of fact, the last time the Canucks farm team rattled off three wins to start the season, their affiliate was the 2012-13 Chicago Wolves! Pretty nutty.
 
There are some similarities between the Canucks and the Comets, beyond just the win-streak, the Comets powerplay, too, has been just awful to start the year. After three games and 15 powerplay tries, the Comets have managed only one goal-for. This past Wednesday, the team gave up their first short-handed goal. Last season the Comets led the league in short-handed goals against with 19 total in 76 games.
 
But let’s not drown in the negative thinking, because this team has looked solid to start the year! It’s hard to fault a team when their speed and gritty play has led to some very exciting hockey. Particular commendations have to go to the bottom six players such as Justin Bailey, Jonah Gadjovich, and Vincent Arseneau. The fourth line has been playing hard with aggressive forechecking, which has directly led to goals-for, scoring chances, and penalty-draws to give the Comets multiple powerplay opportunities.
 
The Comets did great in a dominant victory over their archrivals, the Syracuse Crunch. I believe the Comets caught the Crunch off-guard with their speed in the transition game. Multiple times Wednesday, the Comets caught the Crunch on slow line-changes to spring forwards on breakaway opportunities.
 
To defeat the defending Calder Cup Champion Charlotte Checkers, they’ll have to maintain that same transition game to try to make it four in a row. The Checkers have been playing highly undisciplined hockey (21 penalties in just four games played) but have made up for it with a league-leading penalty kill. To offset the skill of the Checkers’ league-leading penalty kill, the Comets will need to capitalize on their powerplay opportunities if they arise.
 
I have faith that at even-strength, the Comets have the speed and the high-end skill to win. Having an effective powerplay as back-up will just be helpful in case the even-strength game doesn’t work out.
 
LW C RW
Boucher (#24) Camper (#19) Lind (#13)
Goldobin (#77) Jasek (#9) Baertschi (#47)
Bailey (#95) Perron (#27) MacEwen (#15)
Malone (#17) Hamilton (#36) Arseneau (#18)
LD RD
Brisebois (#55) Rafferty (#25)
Juolevi (#48) Chatfield (#5)
Teves (#4) Blujus (#8)
G
Michael DiPietro (G)
 
Jonah Gadjovich picked up an upper-body strain during the match against Syracuse, so his status is uncertain for the weekends game. Subbing in for him is Seamus Malone, who returns after missing the entirety of training camp with an arm injury. Malone was one of the Comets lone bright spots towards the end of last season when he picked up three goals in six games before a season-ending injury to his arm.
 
RE: INJURY REPORT
 
Injury Report -- --
Jonah Gadjovich(upper-body) Tyler Graovac (knee) Carter Bancks (upper body)
 
Healthy Scratches -- --
Stefan LeBlanc Mitch Eliot Dyson Stevenson
 

1st period

 
Comets in White
 
 

Score at the end of the first Period: 3-0 Comets

 
Well, that’s certainly one way to start a period! The team is displaying quite a versatile, well-balanced attack, with contributions coming from all four forward groups AND the three defensive pairings. Hard to find any faults with any play that Period. The 4-on-4, despite being pinned in their end, wasn’t even that bad, as they went on to disrupt practically all of the Checkers scoring chances. Digging the compete of this team.
 

2nd Period

 
 

The Score at the end of the 2nd Period: 4-0 Comets

 
After getting dominated for the bulk of the second Period, leave it to Reid Boucher to come up huge on the penalty kill to regain the Comets momentum. After the short-handed goal, the Comets looked have regained their fire, returning to some heavy offensive zone pressure to close out the Period. Comets defensive work still holding solid while Michael Di Pietro has been making some clutch saves all Period to keep the Comets in this one. Next Period might be more dominance from the Comets as they’ll have the bench facing the offensive zone this time.
 

3rd Period

 
 

Final Score: 8-2 Comets

 

Scoresheet

 
Period Team Goalscorer Primary assist helper type
1st Utica Carter Camper Kole Lind -- 5v5
1st Utica Brogan Rafferty Nikolay Goldobin Sven Baertschi 5v5
1st Utica Justin Bailey Zack MacEwen -- 5v5
2nd Utica Reid Boucher -- -- shg
3rd Charlotte Hunter Shinkaruk Gustav Forsling Max McCormick 5v5
3rd Utica Sven Baertschi Nikolay Goldobin Lukas Jasek 5v5
3rd Charlotte Eetu Luostarinen David Gust -- 5v5
3rd Utica Kole Lind Zack MacEwen Nikolay Goldobin PPG
3rd Utica Dylan Blujus Francis Perron Zack MacEwen 5v5
3rd Utica Justin Bailey Guillaume Brisebois Francis Perron 5v5
 

Takeaways

 
The Good:
 
 
The So-So:
 
 

Comets 18 Stars

 
The Comets Trajectory?
 
The Comets are back in action tomorrow for their 3rd of a four-game home-stand, when they take on their division rivals, the Rochester Americans. Fortunately, the Amurks are without Victor Oloffsson who terrorized the Comets last season. IIRC: Olofsson picked up something like 15 points in 8 or 10 games against the Comets last year.
The Comets are looking great to start the season despite some of the early adversity they’ve faced. Their wins to start this year aren’t coming against teams like the Laval Rocket or Belleville Senators, either. They've been coming against legit competition, so its exciting times for the farm!
 
As always, if you want to read up on this Comets Harvest or the 2018-19 Farmies editions, you can find them all at my Comets Harvest Blog here
 
If you want a more condensed version of Comets recaps, you can now find MORE of my writing at thesinbin.net
 
also, let me know what titles do you prefer
simplified Utica Comets (standings) vs. Opponent (opponents standings)
or a boiled down lede describing the game lke Tonights?
Cheers!
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Strickland: Golden Knights to announce AHL affiliate today

submitted by kmad to hockey [link] [comments]

The Chicago Wolves have signed an affiliation agreement with the Vegas Golden Knights

The Chicago Wolves have signed an affiliation agreement with the Vegas Golden Knights submitted by quiver12345 to stlouisblues [link] [comments]

Who could replace Dave Hakstol? A glance at some potentially available NHL Coaches.

John Anderson
Kicking off our list is former Thrashers coach John Anderson. Like many coaches Anderson first saw success as a player in the NHL rather than a coach. He was a prolific goal scorer, racking up over 600 points with the Maple Leafs, Nordiques, and Whalers. Anderson spent a very long time with the Chicago Wolves in the IHL and AHL where he led the team to the playoffs in all but two seasons, and won three championships with the team.
In 2008 Anderson left Chicago for his only stint in the NHL with the Thrashers. After two disappointing seasons with the team he was canned.
Drew Bannister
Bannister took over as Head Coach of the OHL's Greyhounds after three years serving as Assistant Coach of the Owen Sound Attack. He took the league by storm, taking his teams to the playoffs in every year with the team, including a trip to the finals. Bannister is one of the best up and coming coaches right now, but likely needs some more time coaching at the AHL level before making the jump to the NHL.
Dan Bylsma
Dan Bylsma once seemed like the best coaches in the NHL. He took the Penguins over mid-season and took them to the Stanley Cup. Then became the fastest coach to reach 200 wins. It's not all sunshine and flowers for Bylsma though, he isn't always well liked by his players and struggles to adjust his lines during games.
Jack Capuano
Jack Capuano came up through the Islanders organization, spending 13 years with them in some capacity. He saw limited success with the team but ultimately proved to be an ineffective coach at the NHL level, despite showing flashes of greatness at lower level leagues.
Guy Carbonneau
After a long and successful playing career Carbonneau served as an Assistant Coach for the Montreal Canadiens and the Dallas Stars. After the 2006 season Carbonneau took the reins from Interim Coach and GM Bob Gainey where he flourished for the better part of three seasons. In 2008 he narrowly lost in voting to Bruce Boudreau for the Jack Adams Trophy. But in 2009 Carbonneau was fired, a move that had fans angry and confused. After leaving the Canadiens Carbonneau took a year off from coaching and returned in 2010 to coach the team he co-owned, the Chicoutimi Sagueneens. Carbonneau lasted 15 games before he decided to resign as coach. He hasn’t had a coaching job since.
Marc Crawford
Marc Crawford’s start to his coaching career was lacklustre. After two mediocre seasons with the Cornwall Royals he made the move to the AHL where he began his climb to coaching stardom. With St. John’s Crawford shined, taking the team to the finals in his first season with the team. In three seasons with St. John’s Crawford impressed the Nordiques so much that he was offered the position of Head Coach. Crawford won the Jack Adams Trophy in his first season and remained with the team in their move to Colorado where he led the team to their first ever Stanley Cup.
Crawford was never able to replicate his success in Colorado and after a good stint in Vancouver and unimpressive stints with Dallas and LA he moved away from the NHL for a fresh start. Crawford moved to Switzerland to coach the Zurich Lions. Under Crawford the Lions won a championship and had another finals berth, but after a disappointing performance in the 2016 playoffs Crawford was let go. He’s recently come back to the NHL as an Associate Coach with the Senators, hoping to impress enough to earn a head coaching job.
Randy Cunneyworth
Loyal to Rochester, Cunneyworth spent plenty of time with the organization both as a player and a coach. Cunneyworth has been an on and off member of the organization from 1980 to 2016.
He had one stint in the NHL as an Interim Head Coach for the Montreal Canadiens. This move was highly controversial and was the cause of protests due to the fact that Cunneyworth could not speak French. After an unimpressive season Cunneyworth returned to his position as Assistant Coach only to be fired a month later.
Kevin Dineen
Best known for his days as a player, Dineen is underrated as a coach. After some strong seasons with the Portland Pirates Dineen was given a shot as an NHL coach with the Florida Panthers. In his first season with the Panthers Dineen took the team to a surprising division title and playoff berth. Although he saw success in his first season he didn’t see very much in the two seasons after and he was fired.
Dineen has served as Assistant Coach of the Chicago Blackhawks since he was let go, and in 2014 he coached Canada’s Women’s Hockey Team to Gold at the Sochi Olympics.
Dominique Ducharme
Likely next in line for Montreal's Head Coaching job, Ducharme is well proven at the Junior level and is learning the ropes of coaching pro hockey with Montreal. At the helm of the Mooseheads, Ducharme's team had one of the most dominant seasons in recent memory, posting a 58-6-4 record en route to a championship.
Dallas Eakins
After spending seven years in the Toronto Maple Leafs organization the hype for Eakins was through the roof. He’d spent time as Leafs Assistant Coach and Marlies Head Coach and had done well in both roles. Many speculated that then Leafs Head Coach Randy Carlyle would be getting the can so the Leafs could hire Eakins, but that never came to fruition. Carlyle kept his job as bench boss for another season and Eakins joined the Oilers.
Eakins tenure with the Oilers was short and disappointing, but the jury is still out as to whether the blame falls on Eakins for that.
Scott Gordon
Gordon last head coaching job was as Capuano’s predecessor in New York. He served as Head Coach for the team for two of the team’s darker years where they failed to make the playoffs. On the bright side he did help land John Tavares.
Since leaving the Islanders organization Gordon served as Assistant Coach of the Maple Leafs before moving on to coach the Flyers’ AHL affiliates the Lehigh Valley Phantoms. He seems to have turned the team around as they looked fairly impressive under him.
Gordon is currently serving as Interim of the Flyers but if he performs well he could be given the job long-term a la Rod Brind'Amour in Carolina.
Wayne Gretzky
Who?
As a coach Gretzky had a disastrous four season campaign as coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. He hasn’t had a coaching job since.
Rikard Grönborg
Since the start of this season, analysts have been questioning whether Grönborg will be the first European coach to take a Head Coach's position in the NHL since 2001. It seems like he may try as he has decided to step down from his role behind Sweden's bench at the end of this season.
Grönborg has some interesting views on the NHL's coaching meta and wishes to try something new. He believes that the majority of teams run the same system and he wants to break that cycle. Grönborg says that he likes to carve out specific roles for players and assign specific tasks for them.
Benoit Groulx
Current Job: Head Coach with the Syracuse Crunch in the AHL
“Tic-tac-tao!”
Benoit Groulx is best known for his role in Team Canada’s 2015 World Junior Championships win where he was credited as a huge factor to the team’s success. Groulx served as a long time Head Coach of the Gatineau Olympiques where he led the team to three championships. Between his 12 seasons with Gatineau Groulx tried his hand in the AHL with the Rochester Americans where he did not see much success. In hopes to make his climb to the NHL Groulx has returned to the AHL as Head Coach of the Syracuse Crunch and took his team to the finals in his first season.
John Gruden
Gruden is probably most notorious for being the first coach of the Flint Firebirds, a coach who was fired for refusing to give the team owner's son extra ice time.
Since leaving the Firebirds, Gruden has made a name for himself, bringing home an OHL championship for the Hamilton Bulldogs and gold medal for Team USA at 2014 IIHF U18 World Championships as an Assistant Coach.
Glen Gulutzan
Gulutzan has experience behind the bench at multiple levels of professional hockey. He's been given two stints as Head Coach at the NHL level but has failed to impress in either one. He was snapped up fairly quickly as an Assistant Coach after his latest firing and it will be interesting to see if another team takes a flyer on him.
George Gwozdecky
George Gwozdecky is one of the most winningest coaches in NCAA Division I hockey history. With 592 total Div I wins he has amassed the 12th most wins of all time, and with 443 wins with the University of Denver he is the most successful coach in the program’s history.
Dave Hakstol
In a shocking turn of events, the Flyers could re-hire Hakstol due to popular demand... lol
Bob Hartley
Bob Hartley has won a major championship in every league he’s coached in, taking the Laval Titan, Hershey Bears, Zurich Lions, and the Colorado Avalanche all the way in his time with them. Most recently Hartley served as Head Coach of the Calgary Flames where he won a Jack Adams Trophy but was ultimately let go of after posting a negative record with the team through four seasons.
Hartley took over head coaching duties with Omsk for the 2018-19 KHL season and currently has the team at the top of their division.
Craig Hartsburg
An accomplished juniors coach that could never put things together at the professional level. Hartsburg always seemed to find himself coaching terrible teams and that isn't necessarily his fault.
Hartsburg has ties to the Flyers, having served as Assistant Coach for the team for six seasons across two different stints in the role.
He may not be interested in taking the role as he left his role as Associate Coach of the Blue Jackets because he struggled with being away from his family.
Mike Hastings
Mike Hastings is the probably the best coach that the NCAA has to offer. He's the winningest coach in USHL history, with three championships and six finals appearances under his belt, and since he started coaching college hockey his teams have always been dominant. In the NCAA Hastings' teams have won the WCHA Championship three times and Hastings has been named WCHA coach of the year twice, once winning the Spencer Penrose Award for best coach across the entirety of college hockey.
Don Hay
Having won the Memorial Cup and President’s Cup three times Don Hay has had a very successful career coaching in the WHL, but he’s found himself unable to stick in higher tiered leagues. Hay has had four stints with three NHL teams as both a Head Coach and as an Assistant Coach, none of which lasted more than a year. Hay also spent three seasons with the Utah Grizzlies in the AHL where he was never able to advance past the first round of the playoffs.
Peter Horachek
Always the bridesmaid and never the bride, Horachek has served as an Interim Head Coach but has never been given a shot in the NHL as anything more. This is likely in part because of his poor performance of both teams he served as Interim for.
Jim Hulton
Who would have thought back in 2000 that Jim Hulton would have been on a list like this 18 years later. Hulton's first experience as a Head Coach with the new expansion team, Mississauga IceDogs was a disaster. His squads had a record of 12-96-3 under him. Hulton resigned, realizing that the team was a lost cause. He fared better with his next team, taking Belleville to the top of the East Division in his first season with the team. Hulton did not let his first stint as a Head Coach define him and has proven to be one of the better coaches in the CHL.
Dale Hunter
Long time Co-Owner, President, and Head Coach of the London Knights Hunter has been a staple for the team and it’s hard to imagine him leaving the team for a coaching gig elsewhere. He did join the Capitals as Head Coach 2011 where his team underperformed and disappointed.
Mike Johnston
A good coach for a defensively minded team, unfortunately Johnston’s only NHL coaching gig was with the Pittsburgh Penguins who at the time were as far from defensively minded as a team could be. After his departure from the Penguins Johnston rejoined the Portland Winterhawks, a team he’s seen some success with as Head Coach in the past.
Sheldon Keefe
Sheldon Keefe is rising through the coaching ranks extremely quickly. After a championship win in the CJHL Keefe took the OHL by storm with the Greyhounds and transformed the team from a pushover to a powerhouse. In just his second season with the team Keefe and the Greyhounds posted their best season in franchise history. Keefe’s contributions to the team’s were recognized as he won both OHL and CHL Coach Of The Year.
In 2015 Keefe was hired as Head Coach of the Toronto Marlies. In his first season he took the team to the Conference Finals. He went on to coach the team to a Calder Cup last season.
Mike Keenan
One of the most winningest coaches of all time, without context you may wonder why he’s struggled recently to get back into the NHL. Mike Keenan does not play well with others. Whether he’s feuding with a Senior V.P., or a General Manager, or with superstars such as Trevor Linden, Brett Hull, or Gretzky, no matter where Keenan is coaching he’ll struggle to get along with his co-workers. Even if he has seemed to calm down as of late his reputation as ‘Iron Mike’ Keenan will continue to hang over his head.
Kris Knoblauch
One of the most talked about names in seasons past, Knoblauch did wonders for the Erie Otters. There's no doubt the teams he's coached were wildly talented, but some credit has to go Knoblauch who won both the WHL and OHL championships and capped off his OHL coaching career with four straight 50+ win seasons. Knoblauch is touted as being a teacher in the dressing room, maybe a good fit on a younger team.
Uwe Krupp
One of the greatest German coaches of all time, Uwe Krupp has coached Germany a total of ten times at the World Juniors, World Championships, and Olympic Games. In five seasons of coaching in DEL Krupp has led his teams to five finals berths, most recently losing to his former team Kolner Haie.
Nate Leaman
Nate Leaman has been the catalyst behind Providence College's success over the past few years, taking the team to their first Frozen Four appearance in 30 years. Leaman runs a system that focuses on fast skating and quick puck movement.
Doug MacLean
Best known for his role as a Hockey Analyst on Sportsnet, what many may not know is that MacLean had a five year NHL Coaching career. While most of his seasons as coach ended in disappointment, MacLean did lead the Florida Panthers to their first and only Stanley Cup Final appearance in his first season as coach.
Paul MacLean
After seeing plenty of success with the Anaheim Mighty Ducks and Detroit Red Wings as an Assistant Coach from 2002 to 2011 MacLean was given his first gig as an NHL Head Coach with the Ottawa Senators. With the Senators MacLean was nominated for the Jack Adams Trophy in each of his first two seasons, winning it in his second season.
Jacques Martin
One of the most experienced coaches on this list, Jacques Martin is the 12th most winningest coach of all time, having amassed 613 total wins from 1986 to 2012. In 1999 Martin took home the Jack Adams Trophy after his Ottawa Senators topped the Northeast Division for the first time in franchise history.
Pierre McGuire
No I’m not joking. Every time an NHL coach is fired McGuire’s name seems to pop up brought up both seriously and non-seriously. McGuire had one brief NHL coaching stint with the Hartford Whalers. He was fired after only six months. Then Whalers captain Pat Verbeek called McGuire’s firing the best that could have happened to the Whalers.
Todd McLellan
One of the more highly touted coaching candidates on the list, McLellan stormed on to the scene with the Sharks in 2008 and never looked back. McLellan's Sharks were one of the most dominant teams of the 2010's but always fell short of the winning it all. He's coming off of a disappointing tenure with the Oilers but will surely bounce back.
Mark Messier
Messier has expressed interest in both General Manager and Head Coach roles and has garnered experience in both roles with Team Canada. It is unlikely that Messier will leave his position with the Oilers at this time.
Mike Milbury
Lmao, who doesn’t love Mike Milbury?
While Milbury extremely successful as Head Coach of the Boston Bruins the same cannot be said for his time with the Isles. With the Bruins he took the team to a Conference Final and a Cup Final, winning Executive of The Year and coaching an All-Star team along the way. His time with the Islanders on the other hand was a disaster to put it lightly. Milbury coached the team to some of their all time worst seasons all the while trading away key pieces such as Zdeno Chara, Bryan McCabe, Olli Jokinen, Eric Brewer, Wade Redden, and Roberto Luongo for scraps. When Milbury finally left the Islanders organization fans breathed a sigh of relief.
Kirk Muller
The heir apparent to Michel Therrien in Montreal (until Julien came along), Muller has spent plenty of time behind the bench as an NHL Assistant Coach with the Montreal Canadiens and St. Louis Blues. But his only job as an NHL Head Coach resulted in a poor stretch as Head Coach of the Carolina Hurricanes.
Andy Murray
Not the tennis player!
With 20 years of NHL coaching experience Murray is a seasoned veteran. He knows how to get the very best out of his players and has a strict no nonsense policy. Since leaving the NHL Murray has joined Western Michigan where he had a very strong start with the team, but team has since gone downhill.
Terry Murray
Terry Murray (no relation to Andy) a member of the Flyers 1976 Stanley Cup winning team returned to the organization after spending time coaching the Washington Capitals. In his time as Head Coach of the Flyers he took the team to a Conference Final and to a Stanley Cup Final in 1997. After his finals loss he moved back and forth between the Flyers organization and other positions around the AHL and NHL.
Todd Nelson
In one short stint in the NHL as Interim Head Coach of the Oilers Nelson began to turn around a struggling team and finished the season stronger than many people expected. Nelson helped struggling young players such as Yakupov, Hall, and Eberle turn develop and finish the season on a high note.
Claude Noel
Although he was able to find success in the AHL winning a Calder Cup in 2004, Noel has never been able to replicate that success in the NHL. Having the distinction of being the first Head Coach of the new Winnipeg Jets there were big expectations for Noel. Expectations that he did not live up to. In four NHL seasons with the Jets and Blue Jackets he never once was able to make the playoffs.
Ted Nolan
Ted Nolan is yet another familiar face for Islanders fans. After a very successful tenure in the CHL and between stints with the Buffalo Sabres, Nolan spent two seasons behind the bench for the Islanders. With New York Nolan took the Isles to the playoffs in his first season, but after missing the playoffs in his second season he was fired. Nolan was recently hired to coach Team Poland internationally.
Adam Oates
Adam Oates is a great coach for a team with a strong defensive corps and a struggling offense. Oates spent two seasons with the Capitals and fans soured on him very quickly due to his offense first coaching style. After leaving Washington he took on an unorthodox role as a co-coach of the New Jersey Devils where he ran the offense and Scott Stevens ran the defense.
Joel Quenneville
Joel Quenneville's resume speaks for itself. He is the number two most winningest coach in NHL history and boasts three Stanley Cups and a Jack Adams Trophy. Quenneville is probably the best coach on this list. He runs a system where forwards take a more defensive role in order to give his team's defensemen room to jump up on the rush and contribute offensively.
Tom Renney
Best known for his international coaching career Tom Renney has coached Team Canada at a total of ten World Championships, winning a total of three Gold Medals, three Silvers, and Two Bronzes. Renney has also seen success after taking over as President of Hockey Canada. Unfortunately that success never translated to the NHL.
Todd Richards
Todd Richards started his head coaching career behind the benches of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins where he led the team to a Calder Cup Final. After his finals appearance he joined the Minnesota Wild as Head Coach. After two disappointing seasons with the Wild he was fired. The season after his firing he was brought on as an Assistant Coach of the Blue Jackets. That same season he replaced Scott Arniel as Head Coach. After failing to make the playoffs in three of his four full seasons with the Jackets and starting his fifth season off 0-7-0 he was fired.
Luke Richardson
Luke Richardson left his job at Binghamton to pursue an NHL coaching job but as positions opened up he did not get a call. Instead of waiting around Richardson went to coach Team Canada at last year’s Spengler Cup, helping Canada capture gold. Richardson is often praised for his abilities as a teacher which may make him a good fit for one of the younger teams in the NHL.
Gary Roberts
Gary Roberts is a very interesting name to bring up in the Head Coach conversation because he doesn’t have any experience coaching. What he does have experience with is training and pushing players to their limit. It would be difficult to lure Roberts away from his current job as a personal trainer.
Larry Robinson
Not only was Larry Robinson one of the best D-men of all time but he was also a very successful Coach. After a somewhat rocky start coaching the Kings, Robinson hit his stride with the New Jersey Devils. In his first partial season with the Devils he helped the team to a Cup win, in his second season he helped the Devils ditch their reputation as an anti-offence team as his Devils lead the NHL in goals.
Patrick Roy
Hot head Patrick Roy showed that he was not a one trick pony when he took the QMJHL by storm as Head Coach of the Quebec Remparts in 2005, leading the team to a finals berth. Although he never won a championship in the league he did make the playoffs every single year and was a part of some deep playoff runs.
After eight years with the Remparts Roy joined his former team the Colorado Avalanche. In his first season with the Avs Roy won his division and clinched the Jack Adams Trophy. Unfortunately for Roy things only went downhill from there. They were eliminated in the first round and failed to qualify in the rest of his tenure with the team.
After the 2015-16 season Roy decided to step away from the Avalanche citing his lack of control over the roster as a main reason for his departure. He would later obtain a position of control, being hired as GM and Head Coach of the QMJHL's Quebec Remparts.
Lindy Ruff
Ruff is one of the most esteemed coaches on this list. After a fairly long NHL career, Ruff joined the Panthers as an Assistant. With the Panthers he took a trip to the Stanley Cup Final which opened a door for him to become a Head Coach. In 1997 he took a Head Coaching position with the Buffalo Sabres, a team he would take to the Stanley Cup Finals once and the Eastern Conference Finals three times.
After some continued mediocrity, the Sabres cut ties with Ruff. Ruff then took a Head Coaching job with the Stars but was let go of after posting mixed (but generally positive) results. He's currently sitting behind the Rangers bench, although he was passed up by David Quinn for the Head Coaching job.
Scott Sandelin
It's rare for teams to hire coaches straight out of NCAA but the Flyers are one of the few teams that have done just that in recent years. Sandelin has been a blessing for UMD, having taken them to the finals three times in his tenure with them, winning two championships.
Brad Shaw
Brad Shaw had his only chance as a Head Coach with the Islanders in 2006 when he took over for Steve Sterling as Interim Head Coach. The Isles’ performance under Shaw was mediocre and he did not return the next season.
Shaw served as Assistant and Associate Coach with the St. Louis Blues, serving under a total of four coaches, never getting the call himself. After the 2015-16 season Shaw left the Blues to pursue other opportunities.
Jason Smith
Being a former Flyers captain likely means that Smith is at the very least on the team's radar. Smith started his coaching career as Assistant for the Senators before taking on the Head Coach role for the Kelowna Rockets. Smith runs a system similar to how he played, preaching hard bodied defensive hockey.
John Stevens
A long time coach in waiting and a key part in two LA Kings Stanley Cup wins, John Stevens was finally given an extended look as Head Coach of the Kings last season. His first season behind the bench went well, but he was canned only 13 games into his second season. Stevens has grown since his time with the Flyers and will likely be back behind an NHL bench in some type of coaching role before next season.
submitted by Chriscftb97 to Flyers [link] [comments]

NHL, AHL, and ECHL Playoff Organizations (Development approaches)

With the AHL playoffs now finalized, 6 NHL clubs plus their AHL and ECHL affiliates made it to the post-season:
  1. Maple Leafs, Marlies, Newfoundland
  2. Carolina, Charlotte, Florida
  3. Tampa, Syracuse, Orlando
  4. Vegas, Wolves, Fort Wayne
  5. Avalanche, Eagles, Utah
  6. Washington, Hershey, South Carolina
Three more clubs without ECHL affiliates also made the post-season:
  1. Sharks, Barracuda, No affiliate (mostly Orlando Solar Bears)
  2. Columbus, Cleveland, No affiliate (mostly Jacksonville Icemen)
  3. Nashville, Milwaukee, No affiliate (grab bag)
These clubs did not qualify for the NHL, AHL, or ECHL
  1. Rangers, Hartford, Maine
  2. Montreal, Laval, No affiliate (mostly Maine Mariners)
  3. Philadelphia, Lehigh Valley, Reading
  4. Arizona, Tucson, Norfolk
  5. Blackhawks, Rockford, Indianapolis
  6. Florida, Springfield, No affiliate (mostly Manchester Monarchs)

Some additional context. Different development situations, models and circumstances:

Club Total AHL Contracts Signed AHL Contracts played in ECHL NHL Contracts played in ECHL
Toronto 24 18 4
Carolina 10 6 4
Tampa 9 4 7
Vegas 4 2 1
Colorado 12 10 6
Washington 7 5 2
San Jose 13 4 3
Columbus 8 4 5
Nashville 12 9 2
Rangers 7 3 6
Montreal 12 6 4
Philadelphia 12 6 1
Arizona 7 4 2
Chicago 12 7 2
Florida 10 2 4
NHL Average 10.5 (325 total) 5.9 (184 total) 3.4 (104 total)
note: ATOs and PTOs are not included in these totals. SPCs only.
A very interesting trend is 1. the increased usage of the AHL contract and 2. the increased usage of the ECHL affiliates. Last year, 282 AHL contracts were signed, and 99 of those players played in the ECHL at least one game (vs. 325/184 this year). NHL contracted players appearing in the ECHL has also hit a new high, more than 50% higher than last year. AHL contracts have increased steadily since 2013-14 (246), 2014-15 (251), 2015-16 (250), 2016-17 (276), 2017-18 (282), 2018-19 (325). Some teams embrace the AHL contract heavily (Toronto, Islanders, Buffalo, Pittsburgh), some teams do not (New Jersey, Tampa, Minnesota, Arizona).
I can't really say there is strong correlational evidence one way or another, but I figured hockey would find this data interesting.
submitted by irishcedar to hockey [link] [comments]

Expansion draft. Can someone explain how the new Vegas Knights get farm teams associated with them??

Do they build from the ground up? Or do they just pick clubs unassigned to other NHL teams?
How does it work?
submitted by BO3074 to hockey [link] [comments]

Is your team's coach on the hotseat? Who could feasibly replace him? A glance at potentially available Head Coaches.

John Anderson
Kicking off our list is former Thrashers coach John Anderson. Like many coaches Anderson first saw success as a player in the NHL rather than a coach. He was a prolific goal scorer, racking up over 600 points with the Maple Leafs, Nordiques, and Whalers. Anderson spent a very long time with the Chicago Wolves in the IHL and AHL where he led the team to the playoffs in all but two seasons, and won three championships with the team.
In 2008 Anderson left Chicago for his only stint in the NHL with the Atlanta Thrashers. After two disappointing seasons with the team he was canned.
Craig Berube
Long time member of the Flyers organization, Berube started his career as an NHL enforcer. After an 18 year pro playing career Berube made the transition from Philadelphia Phantoms player to Philadelphia Phantoms Assistant Coach. Berube rose through the ranks, going from Assistant Coach to Interim Head Coach to Head Coach of the Phantoms to Assistant Coach of the Flyers, and finally to Head Coach of the Flyers. Unfortunately for Berube he lasted only two seasons before players and fans soured on him.
Dan Bylsma
Dan Bylsma once seemed like the best coaches in the NHL. He took the Penguins over mid-season and took them to the Stanley Cup. Then became the fastest coach to reach 200 wins. It's not all sunshine and flowers for Bylsma though, he isn't always well liked by his players and struggles to adjust his lines during games.
Dave Cameron
No, this is not the former British Prime Minister.
Dave Cameron moved around quite a bit, bouncing back and forth between the AHL and OHL always posting impressive numbers. After 16 years of coaching Cameron finally got his first NHL as Assistant Coach for the Ottawa Senators. Cameron impressed Sens management and once Paul MacLean was let go, he got his shot as Head Coach. Cameron and the Senators were a Cinderella Story in his first season and they surprised by making the playoffs. After a disappointing sophomore campaign Cameron was fired.
Jack Capuano
Jack Capuano came up through the Islanders organization, spending 13 years with them in some capacity. He saw limited success with the team but ultimately proved to be an ineffective coach at the NHL level, despite showing flashes of greatness at lower level leagues.
Guy Carbonneau
After a long and successful playing career Carbonneau served as an Assistant Coach for the Montreal Canadiens and the Dallas Stars. After the 2006 season Carbonneau took the reins from Interim Head Coach and GM Bob Gainey where he flourished for the better part of three seasons. In 2008 he narrowly lost in voting to Bruce Boudreau for the Jack Adams Trophy. But in 2009 Carbonneau was fired, a move that had fans angry and confused. After leaving the Canadiens Carbonneau took a year off from coaching and returned in 2010 to coach the team he co-owned, the Chicoutimi Sagueneens. Carbonneau lasted 15 games before he decided to resign as coach. He hasn’t had a coaching job since.
Marc Crawford
Marc Crawford’s start to his coaching career was lacklustre. After two mediocre seasons with the Cornwall Royals he made the move to the AHL where he began his climb to coaching stardom. With St. John’s Crawford shined, taking the team to the finals in his first season with the team. In three seasons with St. John’s Crawford impressed the Nordiques so much that he was offered the position of Head Coach. Crawford won the Jack Adams Trophy in his first season and remained with the team in their move to Colorado where he led the team to their first ever Stanley Cup.
Crawford was never able to replicate his success in Colorado and after a good stint in Vancouver and unimpressive stints with Dallas and Los Angeles he moved away from the NHL for a fresh start. Crawford moved to Switzerland to coach the Zurich Lions. Under Crawford the Lions won a championship and had another finals berth, but after a disappointing performance in the 2016 playoffs Crawford was let go. He’s recently come back to the NHL as an Associate Coach with the Senators, hoping to impress enough to earn a head coaching job.
Randy Cunneyworth
Loyal to the Rochester Americans, Cunneyworth spent plenty of time with the organization both as a player and a coach. Cunneyworth has been an on and off member of the organization from 1980 to 2016.
Cunneyworth had one stint in the NHL as an Interim Head Coach for the Montreal Canadiens. This move was highly controversial and was the cause of protests due to the fact that Cunneyworth could not speak French. After an unimpressive season Cunneyworth returned to his position as Assistant Coach only to be fired a month later.
Willie Desjardins
Desjardins is a junior hockey coaching legend. After joining the Medicine Hat Tigers in 2002, Desjardins took junior hockey by storm. He lead the team to a Memorial Cup berth and then two WHL Championships, as well as winning the CHL coach of the year. He followed this up by serving as a bench boss on Canada's 2009 gold medal winning World Juniors team. He impressed enough to get a look by the Dallas Stars, and after a few years in the organization, along with a Calder Cup, he moved on to his first NHL head coaching gig with the Canucks.
Desjardins surprised in his first year and took his team to the playoffs, but in his two seasons after that, the Canucks were a bottom team in the league. Expect Willie to get another shot at some point.
Kevin Dineen
Best known for his days as a player, Dineen is severely underrated as a coach. After some strong seasons with the Portland Pirates Dineen was given a shot as an NHL coach with the Florida Panthers. In his first season with the Panthers Dineen took the team to a surprising division title and playoff berth. Although he saw success in his first season he didn’t see very much in the two seasons after and he was fired.
Dineen has served as Assistant Coach of the Chicago Blackhawks since he was let go, and in 2014 he coached Canada’s Women’s Hockey Team to Gold at the Sochi Olympics.
Dallas Eakins
After spending seven years in the Toronto Maple Leafs organization the hype for Eakins was through the roof. He’d spent time as Leafs Assistant Coach and Marlies Head Coach and had done well in both roles. Many speculated that then Leafs Head Coach Randy Carlyle would be getting the can so the Leafs could hire Eakins, but that never came to fruition. Carlyle kept his job as bench boss for another season and Eakins joined the Oilers.
Eakins tenure with the Oilers was short and disappointing, but the jury is still out as to whether the blame falls on Eakins for that.
Scott Gordon
Another coach with ties to the Flyers organization. Gordon was Capuano’s predecessor in New York. He served as Head Coach for the team for two of the team’s darker years where they failed to make the playoffs. On the bright side he did help land John Tavares. Since leaving the Islanders organization Gordon served as Assistant Coach of the Maple Leafs before moving on to coach the Flyers’ AHL affiliates the Lehigh Valley Phantoms. He seems to have turned the team around as they've looked fairly impressive under him.
Wayne Gretzky
Who?
As a coach Gretzky had a disastrous four season campaign as coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. He hasn’t had a coaching job since.
Benoit Groulx
Current Job: Head Coach with the Syracuse Crunch in the AHL
“Tic-tac-tao!”
Benoit Groulx is best known for his role in Team Canada’s 2015 World Junior Championships win where he was credited as a huge factor to the team’s success. Groulx served as a long time Head Coach of the Gatineau Olympiques where he led the team to three championships. Between his 12 seasons with the Olympiques Groulx tried his hand in the AHL with the Rochester Americans where he did not see much success. In hopes to make his climb to the NHL Groulx has returned to the AHL as Head Coach of the Syracuse Crunch and took his team to the finals in his first season.
George Gwozdecky
George Gwozdecky is one of the most winningest coaches in NCAA Division I hockey history. With 592 total Div I wins he has amassed the 12th most wins of all time, and with 443 wins with the University of Denver he is the most successful coach in the program’s history.
Bob Hartley
Bob Hartley has won a major championship in every league he’s coached in, taking the Laval Titan, Hershey Bears, Zurich Lions, and the Colorado Avalanche all the way in his time with them. Most recently Hartley served as Head Coach of the Calgary Flames where he won a Jack Adams Trophy but was ultimately let go of after posting a negative record with the team through four seasons.
Don Hay
Having won the Memorial Cup and President’s Cup three times Don Hay has had a very successful career coaching in the WHL, but he’s found himself unable to stick in higher tiered leagues. Hay has had four stints with three NHL teams as both a Head Coach and as an Assistant Coach, none of which lasted more than a year. Hay also spent three seasons with the Utah Grizzlies in the AHL where he was never able to advance past the first round of the playoffs.
Peter Horachek
Always the bridesmaid and never the bride, Horachek has served as an Interim Head Coach but has never been given a shot in the NHL as anything more. This is likely in part because of his poor performance of both teams he served as Interim for.
Dale Hunter
Long time Co-Owner, President, and Head Coach of the London Knights Hunter has been a staple for the team and it’s hard to imagine him leaving the team for a coaching gig elsewhere. He did join the Capitals as Head Coach 2011 where his team underperformed and disappointed.
Mike Johnston
A good coach for a defensively minded team, unfortunately Johnston’s only NHL coaching gig was with the Pittsburgh Penguins who at the time were as far from defensively minded as a team could be. After his departure from the Penguins Johnston rejoined the Portland Winterhawks, a team he’s seen some success with as Head Coach in the past.
Sheldon Keefe
Sheldon Keefe is rising through the coaching ranks extremely quickly. After a championship win in the CJHL Keefe took the OHL by storm with the Greyhounds and transformed the team from a pushover to a powerhouse. In just his second season with the team Keefe and the Greyhounds posted their best season in franchise history. Keefe’s contributions to the team’s were recognized as he won both OHL and CHL Coach Of The Year. In 2015 Keefe was hired as Head Coach of the Toronto Marlies. In his first season he took the team to the Conference Finals.
Mike Keenan
One of the most winningest coaches of all time, without context you may wonder why he’s struggled recently to get back into the NHL. Mike Keenan does not play well with others. Whether he’s feuding with a Senior V.P., or a General Manager, or with superstars such as Trevor Linden, Brett Hull, or Wayne Gretzky, no matter where Keenan is coaching he’ll struggle to get along with his co-workers. Even if he has seemed to calm down as of late his reputation as ‘Iron Mike’ Keenan will continue to hang over his head.
Kris Knoblauch
One of the most talked about names prior to this season, Knoblauch has done wonders for the Erie Otters. There's no doubt the teams he's coached were wildly talented, but some credit has to go Knoblauch who won both the WHL and OHL championships and capped off his OHL coaching career with four straight 50+ win seasons. Knoblauch is touted as being a teacher in the dressing room, maybe a good fit on a younger team. He's the obvious choice as an interim if a certain Dave Hakstol is let go.
Uwe Krupp
One of the greatest German coaches of all time, Uwe Krupp has coached Germany a total of ten times at the World Juniors, World Championships, and Olympic Games. In five seasons of coaching in DEL Krupp has led his teams to five finals berths, most recently losing to his former team Kolner Haie.
Doug MacLean
Best known for his role as a Hockey Analyst on Sportsnet, what many may not know is that MacLean had a five year NHL Coaching career. While most of his seasons as coach ended in disappointment, MacLean did lead the Florida Panthers to their first and only Stanley Cup Final appearance in his first season as coach.
Paul MacLean
After seeing plenty of success with the Anaheim Mighty Ducks and Detroit Red Wings as an Assistant Coach from 2002 to 2011 MacLean was given his first gig as an NHL Head Coach with the Ottawa Senators. With the Senators MacLean was nominated for the Jack Adams Trophy in each of his first two seasons, winning it in his second season.
Jacques Martin
One of the most experienced coaches on this list, Jacques Martin is the 12th most winningest coach of all time, having amassed 613 total wins from 1986 to 2012. In 1999 Martin took home the Jack Adams Trophy after his Ottawa Senators topped the Northeast Division for the first time in franchise history.
Pierre McGuire
No I’m not joking. Every time an NHL coach is fired McGuire’s name seems to pop up brought up both seriously and non-seriously. McGuire had one brief NHL coaching stint with the Hartford Whalers. He was fired after only six months. Then Whalers captain Pat Verbeek called McGuire’s firing the best that could have happened to the Whalers.
Mark Messier
Messier has expressed interest in both General Manager and Head Coach roles and has garnered experience in both roles with Team Canada. It is unlikely that Messier will leave his position with the Oilers at this time.
Mike Milbury
Lmao, who doesn’t love Mike Milbury?
While Milbury extremely successful as Head Coach of the Boston Bruins the same cannot be said for his time with the Isles. With the Bruins he took the team to a Conference Final and a Cup Final, winning Executive of The Year and coaching an All-Star team along the way. His time with the Islanders on the other hand was a disaster to put it lightly. Milbury coached the team to some of their all time worst seasons all the while trading away key pieces such as Zdeno Chara, Bryan McCabe, Olli Jokinen, Eric Brewer, Wade Redden, and Roberto Luongo for scraps. When Milbury finally left the Islanders organization fans breathed a sigh of relief.
Kirk Muller
The heir apparent to Michel Therrien in Montreal (until Julien came along), Muller has spent plenty of time behind the bench as an NHL Assistant Coach with the Montreal Canadiens and St. Louis Blues. But his only job as an NHL Head Coach resulted in a poor stretch as Head Coach of the Carolina Hurricanes.
Andy Murray
No, not the tennis player!
With 20 years of NHL coaching experience Murray is a seasoned veteran. He knows how to get the very best out of his players and has a strict no nonsense policy. Since leaving the NHL Murray has joined Western Michigan where he had a very strong start with the team, but team has since gone downhill.
Terry Murray
Terry Murray (of no relation to Andy) a member of the Flyers 1976 Stanley Cup winning team returned to the organization after spending time coaching the Washington Capitals. In his time as Head Coach of the Flyers he took the team to a Conference Final and to a Stanley Cup Final in 1997. After his finals loss he moved back and forth between the Flyers organization and other positions around the AHL and NHL. He currently serves as the Assistant Coach of the Buffalo Sabres.
Todd Nelson
In his one short stint in the NHL as Interim Head Coach of the Oilers Nelson began to turn around a struggling team and finished the season stronger than many people expected. Nelson helped struggling young players such as Yakupov, Hall, and Eberle turn develop and finish the season on a high note.
Claude Noel
Although he was able to find success in the AHL winning a Calder Cup in 2004, Claude Noele has never been able to replicate that success in the NHL. Having the distinction of being the first Head Coach of the new Winnipeg Jets there were big expectations for Noel. Expectations that he did not live up to. In four NHL seasons with the Jets and Blue Jackets he never once was able to make the playoffs.
Ted Nolan
Ted Nolan is yet another familiar face for Islanders fans. After a very successful tenure in the CHL and between stints with the Buffalo Sabres, Nolan spent two seasons behind the bench for the Islanders. With New York Nolan took the Isles to the playoffs in his first season, but after missing the playoffs in his second season he was fired. Nolan was recently hired to coach Team Poland at the 2018 World Cup.
Adam Oates
Adam Oates is a great coach for a team with a strong defensive corps and a struggling offense. Oates spent two seasons with the Capitals and fans soured on him very quickly due to his offense first coaching style. After leaving Washington he took on an unorthodox role as a co-coach of the New Jersey Devils where he ran the offense and Scott Stevens ran the defense.
Tom Renney
Best known for his international coaching career Tom Renney has coached Team Canada at a total of ten World Championships, winning a total of three Gold Medals, three Silver Medals, and Two Bronze Medals. Renney has also seen success after taking over as President of Hockey Canada. Unfortunately that success never translated to the NHL.
Todd Richards
Todd Richards started his head coaching career behind the benches of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins where he led the team to a Calder Cup Final. After his finals appearance he joined the Minnesota Wild as Head Coach. After two disappointing seasons with the Wild he was fired. The season after his firing he was brought on as an Assistant Coach of the Blue Jackets. That same season he replaced Scott Arniel as Head Coach. After failing to make the playoffs in three of his four full seasons with the Jackets and starting his fifth season off 0-7-0 he was fired.
Luke Richardson
Luke Richardson left his job at Binghamton to pursue an NHL coaching job but as positions opened up he did not get a call. Instead of waiting around Richardson went to coach Team Canada at last year’s Spengler Cup, helping Canada capture gold. Richardson is often praised for his abilities as a teacher which may make him a good fit for one of the younger teams in the NHL.
Gary Roberts
Gary Roberts is a very interesting name to bring up in the Head Coach conversation because he doesn’t have any experience coaching. What he does have experience with is training and pushing players to their limit. It would be difficult to lure Roberts away from his current job as a personal trainer.
Larry Robinson
Not only was Larry Robinson one of the best defensemen of all time but he was also a very successful Head Coach. After a somewhat rocky start coaching the Kings, Robinson hit his stride with the New Jersey Devils. In his first partial season with the Devils he helped the team to a Cup win, and in his second season he helped the Devils ditch their reputation as an anti-offence team as his Devils lead the NHL in goals.
Patrick Roy
Hot head Patrick Roy showed that he was not a one trick pony when he took the QMJHL by storm as Head Coach of the Quebec Remparts in 2005, leading the team to a finals berth. Although he never won a championship in the league he did make the playoffs every single year and was a part of some deep playoff run.
After eight years with the Remparts Roy joined his former team the Colorado Avalanche. In his first season with the Avs Roy won his division and clinched the Jack Adams Trophy. Unfortunately for Roy things only went downhill from there. They were eliminated in the first round of the playoffs and failed to qualify in the rest of his tenure with the team. After the 2015-16 season Roy decided to step away from the Avalanche citing his lack of control over the roster as a main reason for his departure.
Lindy Ruff
Ruff is one of the most esteemed coaches on this list. After a fairly long NHL career, Ruff joined the Panthers as an Assistant Coach. With the Panthers he took a trip to the Stanley Cup Final which opened a door for him to become a Head Coach. In 1997 he took a Head Coaching position with the Buffalo Sabres, a team he would take to the Stanley Cup Finals once and the Eastern Conference Finals three times.
After some continued mediocrity, the Sabres cut ties with Ruff. Ruff then took a Head Coaching job with the Stars but was let go of after posting mixed (but generally positive) results. He's currently sitting behind the Rangers bench, waiting for Alain Vigneault to slip up.
Brad Shaw
Brad Shaw had his only chance as a Head Coach with the Islanders in 2006 when he took over for Steve Sterling as Interim Head Coach. The Isles’ performance under Shaw was mediocre and he did not return the next season.
Shaw served as Assistant and Associate Coach with the St. Louis Blues, serving under a total of four coaches, never getting the call himself. After the 2015-16 season Shaw left the Blues to pursue other opportunities.
Scott Stevens
One of the greatest defenseman of all times and also a serious bruiser. Due to some on ice shenanigans there are a few teams that will likely never reach out to Stevens, but leaving his on ice behaviour in the past, Stevens needs to be snatched up asap. He's a great defensive coach and had a huge role in making the Minnesota Wild's defense arguably the best D-corps in the NHL last season.
Brent Sutter
A member of the famed Sutter hockey family, Brent Sutter not only was a very effective NHL player but is also an effective coach. While he’s had two unimpressive stints in the NHL Sutter has been impressive when coaching the Red Deer Rebels. With 12 seasons under his belt as coach of the Rebels Sutter has led the team to some very deep playoff berths.
Darryl Sutter
Another member of that famed Sutter family, and arguably the most well known. Sutter knows success. He's taken three of the four teams he's coached to the Stanley Cup Finals, and took a fairly mediocre Sharks team to the playoffs in every season he coached them.
Sutter is best suited to coach a large bruising team. He's a tough coach and tends to sour on his players. Probably best fit on a veteran team.
Michel Therrien
Michel Therrien had a bumpy first stint with the Canadiens and the team didn't have much patience for him. He then joined the Penguins organization, working himself up to head coach, and taking the team to the Stanley Cup Finals. He obviously impressed the Habs as they took him back for another term. His second stint was mostly good, but the team and fans soured on him. Therrien is a stubborn coach, but not necessarily a bad one. He'll get another shot eventually.
Dave Tippett
Dave Tippett finished his hockey playing career with the Houston Aeros in the IHL and quickly made the jump from player to assistant coach the year after, later jumping to head coach in that same season. Tippett was immediately impressive, taking the team to the conference finals, before capping off his time with the Aeros with a championship. He was immediately snapped up by the Dallas Stars and massively improved the team, helping them win their division. In Dallas he cemented himself as one of the best coaches in the NHL. Tippett jumped ship to the Arizona Coyotes, a team that had never really done anything, and he quickly made them into a competitive team and coached them to their first ever conference finals. Tippett's coaching wasn't enough though as the team began to struggle despite his strong coaching, eventually parting ways for a fresh start in 2017.
Tippett runs a very good defensive system with some of the best boardplay that I've ever seen.
Troy Ward
Troy Ward has been around the block. He’s coached in eight different leagues in some capacity. He’s was especially successful in tenures with the Trenton Titans of ECHL and Abbotsford Heat of the AHL. More recently Ward has faltered, lasting only 25 games with the Vancouver Giants and then only 60 games with the Madison Capitols.
Ron Wilson
Wilson has made a number of deep playoff runs but he has never been able to win the big prize. Wilson may be best known for his time with the Maple Leafs where he failed to make the playoffs every year he was with the team. After he left the Leafs he had plenty to say as he called out everyone from Phil Kessel to Colby Armstrong to Maple Leafs fans. Funnily enough Ron Wilson’s last game with the Leafs was on a leap day so he quite literally was coaching on borrowed time.
Rob Zettler
Rob Zettler seemed to be Ron Wilson’s right hand man, serving under him as an Assistant Coach in both San Jose and Toronto. In 2002 Zettler did multiple jobs working as an Assistant Coach and colour commentator for the Sharks. After nine years under Wilson, Zettler decided to set out on his own and he joined the Syracuse Crunch. Towards the end of the 2012-13 AHL season Zettler took over as Head Coach of the Crunch and took the team to the the Calder Cup Final
submitted by Chriscftb97 to hockey [link] [comments]

Where Are They Now: Ilya Kovalchuk's Final Game as a Devil Edition

Kovy's final game as a Devil came on April 27th, 2013, at Madison Square Garden in the last game of the lockout-shortened season. Going over this roster and seeing where everyone is now is a good reminder of a team that was once glorious but had its playoff window slammed shut (some say it almost hit Zach Parise on his way out). I hope you learn something interesting, here we go!
Edit: Highlighted players who are still active in the NHL
Bernier, Steve: Skater and Alternate Captain for the AHL's Bridgeport Sound Tigers (affiliate of the New York Islanders)
Brodeur, Martin: Executive VP of Business Development for the NHL's New Jersey Devils
Carter, Ryan: Retired on September 10th, 2017
Clarkson, David: Head Coach, Upper Arlington High School, Upper Arlington, Ohio
Elias, Patrik: Retired on March 31st, 2017
Gionta, Stephen: Skater for the AHL's Bridgeport Sound Tigers (affiliate of the New York Islanders)
Greene, Andy: Skater and Captain for the NHL's New Jersey Devils
Harrold, Peter: Retired after spending the 2015-16 season with the AHL's Chicago Wolves (affiliate of the Chicago Blackhawks)
Hedberg, Johan: Assistant and Goaltending Coach for the NHL's San Jose Sharks
Henrique, Adam: Skater and Alternate Captain for the NHL's Anaheim Ducks
Josefson, Jacob: Skater for the SHL's Djurgarden IF (Fun Fact: So is Niclas Bergfors who was part of the Ilya Kovalchuk trade between New Jersey and Atlanta!)
Larsson, Adam: Skater for the NHL's Edmonton Oilers (#oneforone)
Ponikarovsky, Alexei: Retired from the NHL at the end of the 2012-2013 season, played two more seasons in the KHL (with Ilya Kovalchuk)
Sullivan, Steve: Assistant General Manager of the NHL's Arizona Coyotes
Tallinder, Henrik: This was Tallinder's final NHL game. He played four games with the AHL's Hartford Wolfpack (affiliate of the New York Rangers) before signing with the ZSC Lions of the Swiss league. He retired from hockey on October 9th, 2018
Volchenkov, Anton: Skater for the KHL's Torpedo Nizhny Novgorod
Zajac, Travis: Skater and Alternate Captain for the NHL's New Jersey Devils
Zidlicky, Marek: Retired at the end of the 2015-16 NHL Season
Zubrus, Dainius: Last seen as Captain for Lithuania's national team at the 2018 IIHF World Championship, Zubrus also serves as President of the Lithuanian Ice Hockey Federation
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With Gulutzan having been fired, here's a comprehensive list of potential replacements

John Anderson
Kicking off our list is former Thrashers coach John Anderson. Like many coaches Anderson first saw success as a player in the NHL rather than a coach. He was a prolific goal scorer, racking up over 600 points with the Maple Leafs, Nordiques, and Whalers. Anderson spent a very long time with the Chicago Wolves in the IHL and AHL where he led the team to the playoffs in all but two seasons, and won three championships with the team.
In 2008 Anderson left Chicago for his only stint in the NHL with the Atlanta Thrashers. After two disappointing seasons with the team he was canned.
Craig Berube
Long time member of the Flyers organization, Berube started his career as an NHL enforcer. After an 18 year pro playing career Berube made the transition from Philadelphia Phantoms player to Philadelphia Phantoms Assistant Coach. Berube rose through the ranks, going from Assistant Coach to Interim Head Coach to Head Coach of the Phantoms to Assistant Coach of the Flyers, and finally to Head Coach of the Flyers. Unfortunately for Berube he lasted only two seasons before players and fans soured on him.
Dan Bylsma
Dan Bylsma once seemed like the best coaches in the NHL. He took the Penguins over mid-season and took them to the Stanley Cup. Then became the fastest coach to reach 200 wins. It's not all sunshine and flowers for Bylsma though, he isn't always well liked by his players and struggles to adjust his lines during games.
Jack Capuano
Jack Capuano came up through the Islanders organization, spending 13 years with them in some capacity. He saw limited success with the team but ultimately proved to be an ineffective coach at the NHL level, despite showing flashes of greatness at lower level leagues.
Guy Carbonneau
After a long and successful playing career Carbonneau served as an Assistant Coach for the Montreal Canadiens and the Dallas Stars. After the 2006 season Carbonneau took the reins from Interim Head Coach and GM Bob Gainey where he flourished for the better part of three seasons. In 2008 he narrowly lost in voting to Bruce Boudreau for the Jack Adams Trophy. But in 2009 Carbonneau was fired, a move that had fans angry and confused. After leaving the Canadiens Carbonneau took a year off from coaching and returned in 2010 to coach the team he co-owned, the Chicoutimi Sagueneens. Carbonneau lasted 15 games before he decided to resign as coach. He hasn’t had a coaching job since.
Marc Crawford
Marc Crawford’s start to his coaching career was lacklustre. After two mediocre seasons with the Cornwall Royals he made the move to the AHL where he began his climb to coaching stardom. With St. John’s Crawford shined, taking the team to the finals in his first season with the team. In three seasons with St. John’s Crawford impressed the Nordiques so much that he was offered the position of Head Coach. Crawford won the Jack Adams Trophy in his first season and remained with the team in their move to Colorado where he led the team to their first ever Stanley Cup.
Crawford was never able to replicate his success in Colorado and after a good stint in Vancouver and unimpressive stints with Dallas and Los Angeles he moved away from the NHL for a fresh start. Crawford moved to Switzerland to coach the Zurich Lions. Under Crawford the Lions won a championship and had another finals berth, but after a disappointing performance in the 2016 playoffs Crawford was let go. He’s recently come back to the NHL as an Associate Coach with the Senators, hoping to impress enough to earn a head coaching job.
Randy Cunneyworth
Loyal to the Rochester Americans, Cunneyworth spent plenty of time with the organization both as a player and a coach. Cunneyworth has been an on and off member of the organization from 1980 to 2016.
Cunneyworth had one stint in the NHL as an Interim Head Coach for the Montreal Canadiens. This move was highly controversial and was the cause of protests due to the fact that Cunneyworth could not speak French. After an unimpressive season Cunneyworth returned to his position as Assistant Coach only to be fired a month later.
Willie Desjardins
Desjardins is a junior hockey coaching legend. After joining the Medicine Hat Tigers in 2002, Desjardins took junior hockey by storm. He lead the team to a Memorial Cup berth and then two WHL Championships, as well as winning the CHL coach of the year. He followed this up by serving as a bench boss on Canada's 2009 gold medal winning World Juniors team. He impressed enough to get a look by the Dallas Stars, and after a few years in the organization, along with a Calder Cup, he moved on to his first NHL head coaching gig with the Canucks.
Desjardins surprised in his first year and took his team to the playoffs, but in his two seasons after that, the Canucks were a bottom team in the league. Expect Willie to get another shot at some point.
Kevin Dineen
Best known for his days as a player, Dineen is severely underrated as a coach. After some strong seasons with the Portland Pirates Dineen was given a shot as an NHL coach with the Florida Panthers. In his first season with the Panthers Dineen took the team to a surprising division title and playoff berth. Although he saw success in his first season he didn’t see very much in the two seasons after and he was fired.
Dineen has served as Assistant Coach of the Chicago Blackhawks since he was let go, and in 2014 he coached Canada’s Women’s Hockey Team to Gold at the Sochi Olympics.
Dallas Eakins
After spending seven years in the Toronto Maple Leafs organization the hype for Eakins was through the roof. He’d spent time as Leafs Assistant Coach and Marlies Head Coach and had done well in both roles. Many speculated that then Leafs Head Coach Randy Carlyle would be getting the can so the Leafs could hire Eakins, but that never came to fruition. Carlyle kept his job as bench boss for another season and Eakins joined the Oilers.
Eakins tenure with the Oilers was short and disappointing, but the jury is still out as to whether the blame falls on Eakins for that.
Scott Gordon
Another coach with ties to the Flyers organization. Gordon was Capuano’s predecessor in New York. He served as Head Coach for the team for two of the team’s darker years where they failed to make the playoffs. On the bright side he did help land John Tavares. Since leaving the Islanders organization Gordon served as Assistant Coach of the Maple Leafs before moving on to coach the Flyers’ AHL affiliates the Lehigh Valley Phantoms. He seems to have turned the team around as they've looked fairly impressive under him.
Wayne Gretzky
Who?
As a coach Gretzky had a disastrous four season campaign as coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. He hasn’t had a coaching job since.
Benoit Groulx
Current Job: Head Coach with the Syracuse Crunch in the AHL
“Tic-tac-tao!”
Benoit Groulx is best known for his role in Team Canada’s 2015 World Junior Championships win where he was credited as a huge factor to the team’s success. Groulx served as a long time Head Coach of the Gatineau Olympiques where he led the team to three championships. Between his 12 seasons with the Olympiques Groulx tried his hand in the AHL with the Rochester Americans where he did not see much success. In hopes to make his climb to the NHL Groulx has returned to the AHL as Head Coach of the Syracuse Crunch and took his team to the finals in his first season.
George Gwozdecky
George Gwozdecky is one of the most winningest coaches in NCAA Division I hockey history. With 592 total Div I wins he has amassed the 12th most wins of all time, and with 443 wins with the University of Denver he is the most successful coach in the program’s history.
Bob Hartley
Bob Hartley has won a major championship in every league he’s coached in, taking the Laval Titan, Hershey Bears, Zurich Lions, and the Colorado Avalanche all the way in his time with them. Most recently Hartley served as Head Coach of the Calgary Flames where he won a Jack Adams Trophy but was ultimately let go of after posting a negative record with the team through four seasons.
Don Hay
Having won the Memorial Cup and President’s Cup three times Don Hay has had a very successful career coaching in the WHL, but he’s found himself unable to stick in higher tiered leagues. Hay has had four stints with three NHL teams as both a Head Coach and as an Assistant Coach, none of which lasted more than a year. Hay also spent three seasons with the Utah Grizzlies in the AHL where he was never able to advance past the first round of the playoffs.
Peter Horachek
Always the bridesmaid and never the bride, Horachek has served as an Interim Head Coach but has never been given a shot in the NHL as anything more. This is likely in part because of his poor performance of both teams he served as Interim for.
Dale Hunter
Long time Co-Owner, President, and Head Coach of the London Knights Hunter has been a staple for the team and it’s hard to imagine him leaving the team for a coaching gig elsewhere. He did join the Capitals as Head Coach 2011 where his team underperformed and disappointed.
Mike Johnston
A good coach for a defensively minded team, unfortunately Johnston’s only NHL coaching gig was with the Pittsburgh Penguins who at the time were as far from defensively minded as a team could be. After his departure from the Penguins Johnston rejoined the Portland Winterhawks, a team he’s seen some success with as Head Coach in the past.
Sheldon Keefe
Sheldon Keefe is rising through the coaching ranks extremely quickly. After a championship win in the CJHL Keefe took the OHL by storm with the Greyhounds and transformed the team from a pushover to a powerhouse. In just his second season with the team Keefe and the Greyhounds posted their best season in franchise history. Keefe’s contributions to the team’s were recognized as he won both OHL and CHL Coach Of The Year. In 2015 Keefe was hired as Head Coach of the Toronto Marlies. In his first season he took the team to the Conference Finals.
Mike Keenan
One of the most winningest coaches of all time, without context you may wonder why he’s struggled recently to get back into the NHL. Mike Keenan does not play well with others. Whether he’s feuding with a Senior V.P., or a General Manager, or with superstars such as Trevor Linden, Brett Hull, or Wayne Gretzky, no matter where Keenan is coaching he’ll struggle to get along with his co-workers. Even if he has seemed to calm down as of late his reputation as ‘Iron Mike’ Keenan will continue to hang over his head.
Kris Knoblauch
One of the most talked about names prior to this season, Knoblauch has done wonders for the Erie Otters. There's no doubt the teams he's coached were wildly talented, but some credit has to go Knoblauch who won both the WHL and OHL championships and capped off his OHL coaching career with four straight 50+ win seasons. Knoblauch is touted as being a teacher in the dressing room, maybe a good fit on a younger team. He's the obvious choice as an interim if a certain Dave Hakstol is let go.
Uwe Krupp
One of the greatest German coaches of all time, Uwe Krupp has coached Germany a total of ten times at the World Juniors, World Championships, and Olympic Games. In five seasons of coaching in DEL Krupp has led his teams to five finals berths, most recently losing to his former team Kolner Haie.
Doug MacLean
Best known for his role as a Hockey Analyst on Sportsnet, what many may not know is that MacLean had a five year NHL Coaching career. While most of his seasons as coach ended in disappointment, MacLean did lead the Florida Panthers to their first and only Stanley Cup Final appearance in his first season as coach.
Paul MacLean
After seeing plenty of success with the Anaheim Mighty Ducks and Detroit Red Wings as an Assistant Coach from 2002 to 2011 MacLean was given his first gig as an NHL Head Coach with the Ottawa Senators. With the Senators MacLean was nominated for the Jack Adams Trophy in each of his first two seasons, winning it in his second season.
Jacques Martin
One of the most experienced coaches on this list, Jacques Martin is the 12th most winningest coach of all time, having amassed 613 total wins from 1986 to 2012. In 1999 Martin took home the Jack Adams Trophy after his Ottawa Senators topped the Northeast Division for the first time in franchise history.
Pierre McGuire
No I’m not joking. Every time an NHL coach is fired McGuire’s name seems to pop up brought up both seriously and non-seriously. McGuire had one brief NHL coaching stint with the Hartford Whalers. He was fired after only six months. Then Whalers captain Pat Verbeek called McGuire’s firing the best that could have happened to the Whalers.
Mark Messier
Messier has expressed interest in both General Manager and Head Coach roles and has garnered experience in both roles with Team Canada. It is unlikely that Messier will leave his position with the Oilers at this time.
Mike Milbury
Lmao, who doesn’t love Mike Milbury?
While Milbury extremely successful as Head Coach of the Boston Bruins the same cannot be said for his time with the Isles. With the Bruins he took the team to a Conference Final and a Cup Final, winning Executive of The Year and coaching an All-Star team along the way. His time with the Islanders on the other hand was a disaster to put it lightly. Milbury coached the team to some of their all time worst seasons all the while trading away key pieces such as Zdeno Chara, Bryan McCabe, Olli Jokinen, Eric Brewer, Wade Redden, and Roberto Luongo for scraps. When Milbury finally left the Islanders organization fans breathed a sigh of relief.
Kirk Muller
The heir apparent to Michel Therrien in Montreal (until Julien came along), Muller has spent plenty of time behind the bench as an NHL Assistant Coach with the Montreal Canadiens and St. Louis Blues. But his only job as an NHL Head Coach resulted in a poor stretch as Head Coach of the Carolina Hurricanes.
Andy Murray
No, not the tennis player!
With 20 years of NHL coaching experience Murray is a seasoned veteran. He knows how to get the very best out of his players and has a strict no nonsense policy. Since leaving the NHL Murray has joined Western Michigan where he had a very strong start with the team, but team has since gone downhill.
Terry Murray
Terry Murray (of no relation to Andy) a member of the Flyers 1976 Stanley Cup winning team returned to the organization after spending time coaching the Washington Capitals. In his time as Head Coach of the Flyers he took the team to a Conference Final and to a Stanley Cup Final in 1997. After his finals loss he moved back and forth between the Flyers organization and other positions around the AHL and NHL. He currently serves as the Assistant Coach of the Buffalo Sabres.
Todd Nelson
In his one short stint in the NHL as Interim Head Coach of the Oilers Nelson began to turn around a struggling team and finished the season stronger than many people expected. Nelson helped struggling young players such as Yakupov, Hall, and Eberle turn develop and finish the season on a high note.
Claude Noel
Although he was able to find success in the AHL winning a Calder Cup in 2004, Claude Noele has never been able to replicate that success in the NHL. Having the distinction of being the first Head Coach of the new Winnipeg Jets there were big expectations for Noel. Expectations that he did not live up to. In four NHL seasons with the Jets and Blue Jackets he never once was able to make the playoffs.
Ted Nolan
Ted Nolan is yet another familiar face for Islanders fans. After a very successful tenure in the CHL and between stints with the Buffalo Sabres, Nolan spent two seasons behind the bench for the Islanders. With New York Nolan took the Isles to the playoffs in his first season, but after missing the playoffs in his second season he was fired. Nolan was recently hired to coach Team Poland at the 2018 World Cup.
Adam Oates
Adam Oates is a great coach for a team with a strong defensive corps and a struggling offense. Oates spent two seasons with the Capitals and fans soured on him very quickly due to his offense first coaching style. After leaving Washington he took on an unorthodox role as a co-coach of the New Jersey Devils where he ran the offense and Scott Stevens ran the defense.
Tom Renney
Best known for his international coaching career Tom Renney has coached Team Canada at a total of ten World Championships, winning a total of three Gold Medals, three Silver Medals, and Two Bronze Medals. Renney has also seen success after taking over as President of Hockey Canada. Unfortunately that success never translated to the NHL.
Todd Richards
Todd Richards started his head coaching career behind the benches of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins where he led the team to a Calder Cup Final. After his finals appearance he joined the Minnesota Wild as Head Coach. After two disappointing seasons with the Wild he was fired. The season after his firing he was brought on as an Assistant Coach of the Blue Jackets. That same season he replaced Scott Arniel as Head Coach. After failing to make the playoffs in three of his four full seasons with the Jackets and starting his fifth season off 0-7-0 he was fired.
Luke Richardson
Luke Richardson left his job at Binghamton to pursue an NHL coaching job but as positions opened up he did not get a call. Instead of waiting around Richardson went to coach Team Canada at last year’s Spengler Cup, helping Canada capture gold. Richardson is often praised for his abilities as a teacher which may make him a good fit for one of the younger teams in the NHL.
Gary Roberts
Gary Roberts is a very interesting name to bring up in the Head Coach conversation because he doesn’t have any experience coaching. What he does have experience with is training and pushing players to their limit. It would be difficult to lure Roberts away from his current job as a personal trainer.
Larry Robinson
Not only was Larry Robinson one of the best defensemen of all time but he was also a very successful Head Coach. After a somewhat rocky start coaching the Kings, Robinson hit his stride with the New Jersey Devils. In his first partial season with the Devils he helped the team to a Cup win, and in his second season he helped the Devils ditch their reputation as an anti-offence team as his Devils lead the NHL in goals.
Patrick Roy
Hot head Patrick Roy showed that he was not a one trick pony when he took the QMJHL by storm as Head Coach of the Quebec Remparts in 2005, leading the team to a finals berth. Although he never won a championship in the league he did make the playoffs every single year and was a part of some deep playoff run.
After eight years with the Remparts Roy joined his former team the Colorado Avalanche. In his first season with the Avs Roy won his division and clinched the Jack Adams Trophy. Unfortunately for Roy things only went downhill from there. They were eliminated in the first round of the playoffs and failed to qualify in the rest of his tenure with the team. After the 2015-16 season Roy decided to step away from the Avalanche citing his lack of control over the roster as a main reason for his departure.
Lindy Ruff
Ruff is one of the most esteemed coaches on this list. After a fairly long NHL career, Ruff joined the Panthers as an Assistant Coach. With the Panthers he took a trip to the Stanley Cup Final which opened a door for him to become a Head Coach. In 1997 he took a Head Coaching position with the Buffalo Sabres, a team he would take to the Stanley Cup Finals once and the Eastern Conference Finals three times.
After some continued mediocrity, the Sabres cut ties with Ruff. Ruff then took a Head Coaching job with the Stars but was let go of after posting mixed (but generally positive) results. He's currently sitting behind the Rangers bench, waiting for Alain Vigneault to slip up.
Brad Shaw
Brad Shaw had his only chance as a Head Coach with the Islanders in 2006 when he took over for Steve Sterling as Interim Head Coach. The Isles’ performance under Shaw was mediocre and he did not return the next season.
Shaw served as Assistant and Associate Coach with the St. Louis Blues, serving under a total of four coaches, never getting the call himself. After the 2015-16 season Shaw left the Blues to pursue other opportunities.
Scott Stevens
One of the greatest defenseman of all times and also a serious bruiser. Due to some on ice shenanigans there are a few teams that will likely never reach out to Stevens, but leaving his on ice behaviour in the past, Stevens needs to be snatched up asap. He's a great defensive coach and had a huge role in making the Minnesota Wild's defense arguably the best D-corps in the NHL last season.
Brent Sutter
A member of the famed Sutter hockey family, Brent Sutter not only was a very effective NHL player but is also an effective coach. While he’s had two unimpressive stints in the NHL Sutter has been impressive when coaching the Red Deer Rebels. With 12 seasons under his belt as coach of the Rebels Sutter has led the team to some very deep playoff berths.
Darryl Sutter
Another member of that famed Sutter family, and arguably the most well known. Sutter knows success. He's taken three of the four teams he's coached to the Stanley Cup Finals, and took a fairly mediocre Sharks team to the playoffs in every season he coached them.
Sutter is best suited to coach a large bruising team. He's a tough coach and tends to sour on his players. Probably best fit on a veteran team.
Michel Therrien
Michel Therrien had a bumpy first stint with the Canadiens and the team didn't have much patience for him. He then joined the Penguins organization, working himself up to head coach, and taking the team to the Stanley Cup Finals. He obviously impressed the Habs as they took him back for another term. His second stint was mostly good, but the team and fans soured on him. Therrien is a stubborn coach, but not necessarily a bad one. He'll get another shot eventually.
Dave Tippett
Dave Tippett finished his hockey playing career with the Houston Aeros in the IHL and quickly made the jump from player to assistant coach the year after, later jumping to head coach in that same season. Tippett was immediately impressive, taking the team to the conference finals, before capping off his time with the Aeros with a championship. He was immediately snapped up by the Dallas Stars and massively improved the team, helping them win their division. In Dallas he cemented himself as one of the best coaches in the NHL. Tippett jumped ship to the Arizona Coyotes, a team that had never really done anything, and he quickly made them into a competitive team and coached them to their first ever conference finals. Tippett's coaching wasn't enough though as the team began to struggle despite his strong coaching, eventually parting ways for a fresh start in 2017.
Tippett runs a very good defensive system with some of the best boardplay that I've ever seen.
Alain Vigneault
A tried and true coach, Vigneault has seen some level of success in each of his coaching tenures, including two trips to the Stanley Cup Finals. Vigneault's system relies on speedy players and strong passers that can force high danger opportunities.
Troy Ward
Troy Ward has been around the block. He’s coached in eight different leagues in some capacity. He’s was especially successful in tenures with the Trenton Titans of ECHL and Abbotsford Heat of the AHL. More recently Ward has faltered, lasting only 25 games with the Vancouver Giants and then only 60 games with the Madison Capitols.
Ron Wilson
Wilson has made a number of deep playoff runs but he has never been able to win the big prize. Wilson may be best known for his time with the Maple Leafs where he failed to make the playoffs every year he was with the team. After he left the Leafs he had plenty to say as he called out everyone from Phil Kessel to Colby Armstrong to Maple Leafs fans. Funnily enough Ron Wilson’s last game with the Leafs was on a leap day so he quite literally was coaching on borrowed time.
Rob Zettler
Rob Zettler seemed to be Ron Wilson’s right hand man, serving under him as an Assistant Coach in both San Jose and Toronto. In 2002 Zettler did multiple jobs working as an Assistant Coach and colour commentator for the Sharks. After nine years under Wilson, Zettler decided to set out on his own and he joined the Syracuse Crunch. Towards the end of the 2012-13 AHL season Zettler took over as Head Coach of the Crunch and took the team to the the Calder Cup Final
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The AHL. Team Map/Directory; 2019-20 NHL Affiliations; 2019-20 AHL Graduates; AHL Staff Directory; Corporate Partnerships; 2019-20 On-Ice Officials; 2019-20 AHL Guide & Record Book; 2019-20 AHL Rule Book; AHL History; AHL Hall of Fame; Hockey Fights Cancer; #MascotMadness; FAQs; Calder Cup. Playoff Brackets; Story of the Calder Cup; 2020 The Wolves, who played the Hurricanes’ affiliate in the 2019 Calder Cup Finals, are close to becoming Carolina’s AHL team. Courtesy of the Wolves Chairman Don Levin hopes the Wolves are about The Wolves are again looking for a partner that will balance development with winning and using experienced players at the AHL level. By Brian Sandalow Feb 8, 2020, 8:00am CST Share this story The AHL. Team Map/Directory; 2019-20 NHL Affiliations; 2019-20 AHL Graduates; AHL Staff Directory; Corporate Partnerships; 2019-20 On-Ice Officials; 2019-20 AHL Guide & Record Book; 2019-20 AHL Rule Book; AHL History; AHL Hall of Fame; Hockey Fights Cancer; #MascotMadness; FAQs; Calder Cup. Playoff Brackets; Story of the Calder Cup; 2020 The Chicago Wolves will be searching for a new NHL affiliate, as the Vegas Golden Knights announced the purchase of the AHL’s San Antonio Rampage on Thursday. The Rampage, currently the

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